Presentation Title

Using Echo360 to Support Active Learning

Proposal Format

Presentation

Track Choices

Instructional Technology

Abstract

The use of technology in higher education classrooms is a widely debated concept. The majority of research before 2015 suggests the use of laptops in classrooms results in lower levels of learning due to distraction (Fried, 2008) and note-taking methods (Mueller & Oppenheimer, 2014). However, there is a growing area of research that suggests technology and laptop use in the classroom can increase student perception and judgements of learning (Gilboy, Heinerichs, & Pazzaglia, 2015). However, judgments of learning has not been correlated with actual student performance in higher education courses. The current study takes a novel approach to address the conflicts within the literature and assesses the actual student performance with technology use. This study compared two identical face-to-face courses with and without an active learning platform (see Echo360). Results supported a technologically friendly classroom environment may encourage active learning and student performance through the cognitive-social theory of learning. Previously supported negative effects from technology in the classroom (laptop distraction, laptop note-taking, and lecture capture) were only present in the course without the conformed use of technological devices and an active learning platform. The results of this study support conformity of classroom technology to enhance student learning and exam performance.

Location

Zoom Room 4

Start Date

16-7-2021 2:00 PM

End Date

16-7-2021 2:45 PM

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Jul 16th, 2:00 PM Jul 16th, 2:45 PM

Using Echo360 to Support Active Learning

Zoom Room 4

The use of technology in higher education classrooms is a widely debated concept. The majority of research before 2015 suggests the use of laptops in classrooms results in lower levels of learning due to distraction (Fried, 2008) and note-taking methods (Mueller & Oppenheimer, 2014). However, there is a growing area of research that suggests technology and laptop use in the classroom can increase student perception and judgements of learning (Gilboy, Heinerichs, & Pazzaglia, 2015). However, judgments of learning has not been correlated with actual student performance in higher education courses. The current study takes a novel approach to address the conflicts within the literature and assesses the actual student performance with technology use. This study compared two identical face-to-face courses with and without an active learning platform (see Echo360). Results supported a technologically friendly classroom environment may encourage active learning and student performance through the cognitive-social theory of learning. Previously supported negative effects from technology in the classroom (laptop distraction, laptop note-taking, and lecture capture) were only present in the course without the conformed use of technological devices and an active learning platform. The results of this study support conformity of classroom technology to enhance student learning and exam performance.