Presentation Title

Student and Faculty Perspectives of Caring in the Online Learning Environment

Proposal Format

Presentation

Track Choices

Engaging Pedagogy

Abstract

Caring is the central behavior of nursing, and nurse educators strive to bring this quality to the classroom. But how does caring translate to the online learning environment? We explored the concept of caring in online education and nursing education literature and gathered perceptions of the College of Nursing online graduate students and faculty teaching online courses about faculty caring behaviors through surveys and focus groups. Join our session to learn how you can make your online students feel that they are cared for and cared about. We will compare the top 10 faculty caring behaviors as identified by students and faculty in our study; and point out differences in student responses related to demographics, particularly race and gender. We believe that our findings will apply to other disciplines and educational settings as caring is a basic human value and need. After a brief overview of best practices for implementing caring behaviors in online and hybrid courses, we will invite the audience to suggest additional ways of creating caring learning environments online. Knowing exactly how to project caring in online learning environments will benefit all faculty, students, administrators, and academic support staff across educational settings.

Location

Zoom Room 11

Start Date

16-7-2021 2:00 PM

End Date

16-7-2021 2:45 PM

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Jul 16th, 2:00 PM Jul 16th, 2:45 PM

Student and Faculty Perspectives of Caring in the Online Learning Environment

Zoom Room 11

Caring is the central behavior of nursing, and nurse educators strive to bring this quality to the classroom. But how does caring translate to the online learning environment? We explored the concept of caring in online education and nursing education literature and gathered perceptions of the College of Nursing online graduate students and faculty teaching online courses about faculty caring behaviors through surveys and focus groups. Join our session to learn how you can make your online students feel that they are cared for and cared about. We will compare the top 10 faculty caring behaviors as identified by students and faculty in our study; and point out differences in student responses related to demographics, particularly race and gender. We believe that our findings will apply to other disciplines and educational settings as caring is a basic human value and need. After a brief overview of best practices for implementing caring behaviors in online and hybrid courses, we will invite the audience to suggest additional ways of creating caring learning environments online. Knowing exactly how to project caring in online learning environments will benefit all faculty, students, administrators, and academic support staff across educational settings.