Presentation Title

Strontium-90 Radioactivity Variation with Earth-Sun Distance Resulting in Severe Nuclear Accidents

Presentation Type

Poster

Full Name of Faculty Mentor

George Hitt, Physics and Engineering Science

Major

Engineering Science

Presentation Abstract

Strontium-90 is the most common radioactive man-made isotope. It is much like calcium in that it relates closely to the bone and teeth. Exposure to Strontium-90 radiation can increase cancer rates in the bone or may result in the needed removal of an area. The danger is the isotope's half-life of 28.9 years meaning an increase in radiation. Two Geiger Muller (GM) detector systems consisted of NATS-1510/1520g tube connected to a NATS-EDUC-1510 single-channel analyzer were used in detecting Sr-90 radiation level. The radioactive sources used for these detectors were 0.09270.018 mCi of Sr-90. The Sr-90 detector system had a plateau spanning 850-1150 V with a slope of 13.5% change in counts per 100 V and a dead-time constant of 0.61. The results showed a clear correlation between room temperature and normalized count rate. The GM exhibited a positive correlation coefficient with temperature which was expected.

Location

Poster Session 1

Start Date

21-4-2021 12:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2021 2:00 PM

Disciplines

Engineering Physics

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Apr 21st, 12:00 PM Apr 21st, 2:00 PM

Strontium-90 Radioactivity Variation with Earth-Sun Distance Resulting in Severe Nuclear Accidents

Poster Session 1

Strontium-90 is the most common radioactive man-made isotope. It is much like calcium in that it relates closely to the bone and teeth. Exposure to Strontium-90 radiation can increase cancer rates in the bone or may result in the needed removal of an area. The danger is the isotope's half-life of 28.9 years meaning an increase in radiation. Two Geiger Muller (GM) detector systems consisted of NATS-1510/1520g tube connected to a NATS-EDUC-1510 single-channel analyzer were used in detecting Sr-90 radiation level. The radioactive sources used for these detectors were 0.09270.018 mCi of Sr-90. The Sr-90 detector system had a plateau spanning 850-1150 V with a slope of 13.5% change in counts per 100 V and a dead-time constant of 0.61. The results showed a clear correlation between room temperature and normalized count rate. The GM exhibited a positive correlation coefficient with temperature which was expected.

https://digitalcommons.coastal.edu/ugrc/test1/test1track/90