Presentation Title

Eavesdropping on fishes reveals alterations in the soundscape across tidal creeks

Presentation Type

Poster

Full Name of Faculty Mentor

Cecilia Krahforst , Marine Science

Major

Marine Science

Presentation Abstract

Ecoasoustic measurements of soniferous species can help researchers understand environmental change across time. Baseline data were collected in seven tidal creeks around Baruch Marine Lab. In Raven Lite 2.0, anthrophony and geophony sounds were removed leaving primarily biophonoy sounds. These edited files were processed through R Studio to find acoustic entropy, acoustic diversity, and the acoustic complexity index for each site. Preliminary data suggests that each acoustic index is highly variable across tidal creeks and is related to the soundscape players. Further exploration of these tidal creeks over time suggests that the soundscape varies with water quality, resulting in the highest acoustic activity coinciding with higher salinities. This suggests that the soundscape is tied to water quality at a site, especially salinity. Monitoring acoustic environments across time can provide proxy measurements for environmental change in estuaries.

Location

Poster Session 2

Start Date

22-4-2021 4:30 PM

End Date

22-4-2021 6:30 PM

Disciplines

Oceanography

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Apr 22nd, 4:30 PM Apr 22nd, 6:30 PM

Eavesdropping on fishes reveals alterations in the soundscape across tidal creeks

Poster Session 2

Ecoasoustic measurements of soniferous species can help researchers understand environmental change across time. Baseline data were collected in seven tidal creeks around Baruch Marine Lab. In Raven Lite 2.0, anthrophony and geophony sounds were removed leaving primarily biophonoy sounds. These edited files were processed through R Studio to find acoustic entropy, acoustic diversity, and the acoustic complexity index for each site. Preliminary data suggests that each acoustic index is highly variable across tidal creeks and is related to the soundscape players. Further exploration of these tidal creeks over time suggests that the soundscape varies with water quality, resulting in the highest acoustic activity coinciding with higher salinities. This suggests that the soundscape is tied to water quality at a site, especially salinity. Monitoring acoustic environments across time can provide proxy measurements for environmental change in estuaries.

https://digitalcommons.coastal.edu/ugrc/test1/test1track/89