Presentation Title

The Effect of Post-Event Information on Recognition and Confidence

Presentation Type

Presentation

Full Name of Faculty Mentor

Matthew Murphy, Psychology

Major

Psychology

Presentation Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of misleading post-event information (PEI) on recognition and confidence. Memory is often altered due to the effects of PEI, and because confidence is used as an indicator of memory accuracy, it is important to test if confidence is positively correlated to accuracy. Participants viewed a slideshow simulating an actor stealing multiple items in a store, and then read a narrative which included misleading, neutral, and confirming PEI about the events in the slideshow. Participants completed a forced choice memory task, and were asked to rate their confidence in the accuracy of their answers. Confirming PEI caused both accuracy and confidence scores within sequence A to increase, and misleading PEI caused accuracy scores in sequence B to decrease. There was no effect of PEI on confidence in sequence B. Five out of six Pearson's r correlations showed a positive significant correlation between confidence and accuracy, suggesting that confidence is a predictor of accuracy. This particular subject has implications as it relates to the validity of the Manson Criteria, specifically criteria's #3 (accuracy), and #5 (confidence).

Location

Room 3

Start Date

21-4-2021 2:50 PM

End Date

21-4-2021 3:10 PM

Disciplines

Psychology

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Apr 21st, 2:50 PM Apr 21st, 3:10 PM

The Effect of Post-Event Information on Recognition and Confidence

Room 3

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of misleading post-event information (PEI) on recognition and confidence. Memory is often altered due to the effects of PEI, and because confidence is used as an indicator of memory accuracy, it is important to test if confidence is positively correlated to accuracy. Participants viewed a slideshow simulating an actor stealing multiple items in a store, and then read a narrative which included misleading, neutral, and confirming PEI about the events in the slideshow. Participants completed a forced choice memory task, and were asked to rate their confidence in the accuracy of their answers. Confirming PEI caused both accuracy and confidence scores within sequence A to increase, and misleading PEI caused accuracy scores in sequence B to decrease. There was no effect of PEI on confidence in sequence B. Five out of six Pearson's r correlations showed a positive significant correlation between confidence and accuracy, suggesting that confidence is a predictor of accuracy. This particular subject has implications as it relates to the validity of the Manson Criteria, specifically criteria's #3 (accuracy), and #5 (confidence).

https://digitalcommons.coastal.edu/ugrc/test1/test1track/84