Presentation Title

Economic Effect of Localized Anthropogenic Seafloor Changes in the Florida Keys

Presentation Type

Presentation

Full Name of Faculty Mentor

Aneilya Barnes, History, and Clayton Whiteside, Anthropology & Geography

Major

Anthropology and Geography

Presentation Abstract

As the seafloor is a mostly static surface, the smallest alterations are capable of changing the localized area for both sea and land-goers. Hundreds of shipwrecks and artificial reef habitats exist within the Florida Keys and Gulf of Mexico and play instrumental roles in the ecological and economic landscape for nearby coastal communities. These artificial reef habitats form self-sustaining ecosystems on the seafloor and attract swaths of both human and aquatic visitors. Many locations of shipwrecks off the Florida Keys are logged with GPS within open-access databases. This research analyzes prevalent sites of human seafloor alterations (e.g. dredging, shipwrecks, etc.) near Marathon Key as one of the many instances in which an altered seafloor presents unforeseen ramifications to both the physical and human landscape. Site history, depth, and relief are also considered, and geospatial tools are examined to understand how local communities use these seafloor alterations for commercial success.

Location

Room 3

Start Date

22-4-2021 12:40 PM

End Date

22-4-2021 1:00 PM

Disciplines

Anthropology

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Apr 22nd, 12:40 PM Apr 22nd, 1:00 PM

Economic Effect of Localized Anthropogenic Seafloor Changes in the Florida Keys

Room 3

As the seafloor is a mostly static surface, the smallest alterations are capable of changing the localized area for both sea and land-goers. Hundreds of shipwrecks and artificial reef habitats exist within the Florida Keys and Gulf of Mexico and play instrumental roles in the ecological and economic landscape for nearby coastal communities. These artificial reef habitats form self-sustaining ecosystems on the seafloor and attract swaths of both human and aquatic visitors. Many locations of shipwrecks off the Florida Keys are logged with GPS within open-access databases. This research analyzes prevalent sites of human seafloor alterations (e.g. dredging, shipwrecks, etc.) near Marathon Key as one of the many instances in which an altered seafloor presents unforeseen ramifications to both the physical and human landscape. Site history, depth, and relief are also considered, and geospatial tools are examined to understand how local communities use these seafloor alterations for commercial success.

https://digitalcommons.coastal.edu/ugrc/test1/test1track/50