Presentation Title

Aid as a Screwdriver, Violence as the Nail: The Uncertain Effects of Aid on Violence in Iraq, 2004-2010

Presentation Type

Presentation

Full Name of Faculty Mentor

Jonathan Acuff, Politics

Major

Intelligence & National Security Studies

Presentation Abstract

Can development aid reduce violence? This study looks at the empirical record of the United States' military in Iraq between 2004 and 2010 to address this question. Evidence from the Community Stabilization Program, the Falluja Waste Water Treatment System, and modest-sized Commanders' Emergency Response Program projects suggests that development aid can only effectively reduce violence when implemented in an already-secure location. When implemented in an insecure location, development aid and stabilization projects are likely to have no impact on or increase the levels of violence. While development aid is valuable in many respects, the findings of this study suggest it is not an appropriate tool to utilize if the goal is to reduce violence.

Location

Room 3

Start Date

22-4-2021 2:20 PM

End Date

22-4-2021 2:40 PM

Disciplines

Defense and Security Studies

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Apr 22nd, 2:20 PM Apr 22nd, 2:40 PM

Aid as a Screwdriver, Violence as the Nail: The Uncertain Effects of Aid on Violence in Iraq, 2004-2010

Room 3

Can development aid reduce violence? This study looks at the empirical record of the United States' military in Iraq between 2004 and 2010 to address this question. Evidence from the Community Stabilization Program, the Falluja Waste Water Treatment System, and modest-sized Commanders' Emergency Response Program projects suggests that development aid can only effectively reduce violence when implemented in an already-secure location. When implemented in an insecure location, development aid and stabilization projects are likely to have no impact on or increase the levels of violence. While development aid is valuable in many respects, the findings of this study suggest it is not an appropriate tool to utilize if the goal is to reduce violence.

https://digitalcommons.coastal.edu/ugrc/test1/test1track/45