Presentation Title

Structured and Unstructured Movement in 5th Grade Classrooms: Effects on Students' Performance

Presentation Type

Event

Full Name of Faculty Mentor

Richard Costner

Major

Elementary Education

Presentation Abstract

Research shows students need to experience integrated movement in the classroom every fifteen to twenty minutes (Jensen, 2000; Buskist, Gross, & Reilly, 2012). In this study, three Elementary candidates, each in a 5th- grade classroom, taught four identical content-area lessons. One candidate taught four lessons with no opportunity for student movement. A second candidate taught four lessons but implemented unstructured, free-form movement opportunities. Students were provided with opportunities to move throughout the instructional activities but were not required to do so. A third candidate taught four lessons but deliberately incorporated more structured movement into each learning activity. The students in this classroom executed a series of yoga-like calisthenics and orchestrated movements led by the candidate, who specifically required students to participate. Candidates used identical exit slips to assess the students after each lesson; analysis of the scores provides insight about students' movement and their academic performance.

Course

EDEL 472 (completed for honors credit)NA

Location

Lib Jackson Student Union, Atrium

Start Date

16-4-2019 12:30 PM

End Date

16-4-2019 2:30 PM

Disciplines

Elementary Education

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Apr 16th, 12:30 PM Apr 16th, 2:30 PM

Structured and Unstructured Movement in 5th Grade Classrooms: Effects on Students' Performance

Lib Jackson Student Union, Atrium

Research shows students need to experience integrated movement in the classroom every fifteen to twenty minutes (Jensen, 2000; Buskist, Gross, & Reilly, 2012). In this study, three Elementary candidates, each in a 5th- grade classroom, taught four identical content-area lessons. One candidate taught four lessons with no opportunity for student movement. A second candidate taught four lessons but implemented unstructured, free-form movement opportunities. Students were provided with opportunities to move throughout the instructional activities but were not required to do so. A third candidate taught four lessons but deliberately incorporated more structured movement into each learning activity. The students in this classroom executed a series of yoga-like calisthenics and orchestrated movements led by the candidate, who specifically required students to participate. Candidates used identical exit slips to assess the students after each lesson; analysis of the scores provides insight about students' movement and their academic performance.