Presentation Title

Using a Hybrid Instructional Model for Co-Teaching an Interdisciplinary Study Abroad Program

Proposal Format

Presentation

Track Choices

Engaging Pedagogy

Abstract

This presentation discusses an inter-disciplinary program (History and Anthropology and Geography) focused on landscapes and heritage as interrelated outcomes of both preservation and modernization across space and over time. It was taught as a hybrid program that included a ten-day trip to France followed by ten days of online learning. Both faculty members have considerable in-country living experience, fluent language skills, and local familial ties, all of which facilitated trip planning and execution. The During the trip, all field lectures were co-taught and all students completed the same activities, readings, and assignments; after the trip, student assignments differentiated based on the course(s) in which they were enrolled. Co-teaching promoted group cohesion and underscored the interdisciplinary approach to studying landscapes and heritage that melded geography and history, while the hybrid model allowed for course specificity and lowered student cost, which allowed us to recruit a more diverse cohort.

Location

Zoom Room 1

Start Date

16-7-2021 9:25 AM

End Date

16-7-2021 9:45 AM

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Jul 16th, 9:25 AM Jul 16th, 9:45 AM

Using a Hybrid Instructional Model for Co-Teaching an Interdisciplinary Study Abroad Program

Zoom Room 1

This presentation discusses an inter-disciplinary program (History and Anthropology and Geography) focused on landscapes and heritage as interrelated outcomes of both preservation and modernization across space and over time. It was taught as a hybrid program that included a ten-day trip to France followed by ten days of online learning. Both faculty members have considerable in-country living experience, fluent language skills, and local familial ties, all of which facilitated trip planning and execution. The During the trip, all field lectures were co-taught and all students completed the same activities, readings, and assignments; after the trip, student assignments differentiated based on the course(s) in which they were enrolled. Co-teaching promoted group cohesion and underscored the interdisciplinary approach to studying landscapes and heritage that melded geography and history, while the hybrid model allowed for course specificity and lowered student cost, which allowed us to recruit a more diverse cohort.